QlikView Functions – Complete List of Functions with Examples

1. QlikView Functions – Objective

In our last tutorial, we study QlikView Synthetic Keys. Here, we will open a new chapter called QlikView Functions. There are total 21 functions in QlikView. Along with this, we will study a list of QlikView Functions with their syntax and examples.

You can either apply these QlikView functions by typing them directly in the script editor where your script is loaded or you can select from an already fed list while creating a table box.

So, let’s start QlikView Functions Tutorial.

QlikView Functions - Complete List of Functions with Examples

QlikView Functions – Complete List of Functions with Examples

2. What are QlikView Functions?

QlikView Functions are used to perform mathematical as well as many other kinds of operations on the data stored in-memory of Qlikview. While creating a table box, you must remember that a dialogue box opens where you can enter the table’s title and add fields from your source file to your table box. In the same dialogue box, at the bottom left, you will find a CALCULATION CONDITION option. When you go to the drop down menu you will have a new dialogue box EDIT EXPRESSION.

In the bottom half of this window, go to the FUNCTIONS tab. There are two fields to now, FUNCTION CATEGORY and FUNCTION NAME. You can select from a long list of QlikView functions and once you select one of these, you can choose specific function name within a category. Now to apply the selected function upon your data you need to paste the expression on the upper half of the editor and modify the command according to your table fields.

Do you know What is QlikView IntervalMatch & Match Function?

QlikView Functions - Complete List of Functions with Examples

QlikView Functions – Introduction

3. List of QlikView Functions

Given below are all the QlikView functions category a user can choose.

  • Aggregation

  • Color

  • Conditional

  • Counter Functions

  • Date and Time

  • Exponential and Logarithmic

  • Financial

  • Formatting

  • General Numeric

  • Inter-record

  • Logical Function

  • Mapping Function

  • Mathematical constants and parameter-free functions

  • None

  • Null

  • Number Interpretation

  • Range

  • Ranking

  • String

  • System

  • Trigonometric and Hyperbolic

Let’s Explore QlikView Join Functions and its Types

4. Types of QlikView Functions

In this part of the QlikView Functions Tutorial, we will understand the work of each function with example and syntax.

i. General Numeric Functions in QlikView

There are 18 subtypes of QlikView Functions:

  • div(x1 , x2)

Integer division. Both parameters are interpreted as real numbers, i.e. they do not have to be integers. The result is the integer part of the result of the arithmetic division, a real number.

Examples:

div( 7,2 ) returns 3

  • mod(x1 , x2)

Mathematical modulus function. Both parameters must have integer values. x2 must be greater than 0. The result is the non-negative remainder of an integer division.

Examples:

mod( 7,2 ) returns 1

mod( 7.5,2 ) returns NULL

mod( 9,3 ) returns 0

mod( -4,3 ) returns 2

  • fmod(x1 , x2)

Generalized modulus function. Both parameters are interpreted as real numbers, i.e. they do not have to be integers. The result is the remainder of the integer division, a real number.

Examples:

fmod( 7,2 ) returns 1

fmod( 7.5,2 ) returns 1.5

fmod( 9,3 ) returns 0

fmod( -4,3 ) returns -1

  • ceil(x [ , base [ , offset ]])

Rounding of x upwards to the nearest multiple of base with an offset of offset. The result is a number.

Examples:

ceil( 2.4 ) returns 3

ceil( 2.6 ) returns 3

ceil( 3.88 , 0.1 ) returns 3.9

ceil( 3.88 , 5 ) returns 5

  • floor(x [ , base [ , offset ]])

Rounding of x downwards to the nearest multiple of base with an offset of offset. The result is a number.

Examples:

floor( 2.4 ) returns 2

floor( 2.6 ) returns 2

floor( 3.88 , 0.1 ) returns 3.8

  • round(x [ , step [ , offset ]])

Rounding of x upwards or downwards n number of steps with an offset of offset. A result is a number. If x is exactly in the middle of an interval, it is rounded upwards. The function complies with the IEEE standard

64-bit floating point numbers.

Examples:

round( 2.4 ) returns 2

round( 2.6 ) returns 3

  • fabs(x)

The absolute value of x. The result is a positive number.

Examples:

fabs( 2.4 ) returns 2.4

  • numsum(expr1 [ , expr2, … exprN ])

Returns the numeric sum of 1 to N arguments. As opposed to the + operator, numsum will treat all nonnumeric values as 0.

Read about QlikView Join Functions

Examples:

numsum( 1,2,4 ) returns 7

numsum( 1,’xyz’ ) returns 1

  • numcount(expr1 [ , expr2, … exprN ])

Returns the number of numeric values found in 1 to N arguments

Examples:

numcount( 1,2,4, ) returns 3

  • numavg(expr1 [ , expr2, … exprN ])

Returns the numeric average of 1 to N arguments. If no numeric value is found, NULL is returned.

Examples:

numavg( 1,2,4 ) returns 2.33333333

  • nummin(expr1 [ , expr2, … exprN ])

Returns the lowest numeric value of 1 to N arguments. If no numeric value is found, NULL is returned.

Examples:

nummin( 1,2,4 ) returns 1

  • nummax(expr1 [ , expr2, … exprN ])

Returns the highest numeric value of 1 to N arguments. If no numeric value is found, NULL is returned.

Examples:

nummax( 1,2,4 ) returns 4

  • fact(n)

Returns the factorial of a positive integer n. If the number n is not an integer it will be truncated. Non-positive numbers will return NULL.

Examples:

fact( 1 ) returns 1

  • combin(n1, n2)

Returns the number of combinations of n2 items that can be picked from a group of n1 items. The order in which the items are selected is insignificant. Non-integer items will be truncated.

Example:

How many combinations of 7 numbers can be picked from a total of 35 Lotto numbers?

combin( 35,7 ) returns 6 724 520

  • even(n)

Returns true if n is an even integer, false if n is an odd integer and NULL if n is not an integer.

Examples:

even( 3 ) returns false

  • odd(n)

Returns true if n is an odd integer, false if n is an even integer and NULL if n is not an integer.

Examples:

odd( 3 ) returns true

  • sign(x)

Returns 1, 0 or -1 depending on whether x is a number, 0 or a negative number. If no numeric value is found, NULL is returned.

Examples:

sign( 66 ) returns 1

  • bitcount(i)

Returns the number of set bits in i. Where i is interpreted as a signed 64-bit integer, though only the first 48 bits are significant. A value above 48-bits will return NULL.

Examples:

bitcount ( 3 ) returns 2

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ii. Range Functions in QlikView

Following are the 18 sub-types of Range QlikView Functions:

  • rangesum(expr1 [ , expr2, … exprN ])

Returns the sum of a range of 1 to N arguments. As opposed to the + operator, rangesum will treat all nonnumeric

values as 0.

Examples:

rangesum (1,2,4) returns 7

  • rangeavg(expr1 [ , expr2, … exprN ])

Returns the average of a range of 1 to N arguments. If no numeric value is found, NULL is returned.

Examples:

rangeavg (1,2,4) returns 2.33333333

  • rangecount(expr1 [ , expr2, … exprN ])

Returns the number of values found within a range of 1 to N arguments. NULL values are not counted.

Examples:

rangecount (1,2,4) returns 3

  • rangemin(expr1 [ , expr2, … exprN ])

Returns the lowest numeric value found within a range 1 to N arguments. If no numeric value is found, NULL is returned.

Examples:

rangemin (1,2,4) returns 1

  • rangemax(expr1 [ , expr2, … exprN ])

Returns the highest numeric values found within a range of 1 to N arguments. If no numeric value is found, NULL is returned.

Examples:

rangemax (1,2,4) returns 4

  • rangestdev(expr1 [ , expr2, … exprN ] )

Returns the standard deviation found within a range of 1 to N arguments. If no numeric value is found, NULL is returned.

Examples:

rangestdev (1,2,4) returns 1.5275252316519

  • rangeskew(expr1 [ , expr2, … exprN ])

Returns the skewness within a range of 1 to N arguments. If no numeric value is found, NULL is returned.

Examples:

rangeskew (1,2,4) returns 0.93521952958283

  • rangekurtosis(expr1 [ , expr2, … exprN ])

Returns the kurtosis within a range of 1 to N arguments. If no numeric value is found, NULL is returned.

Examples:

rangekurtosis (1,2,4,7) returns -0.28571428571429

  • rangefractile(fractile, expr1 [ , expr2, … exprN ])

Returns the fractile within a range of 1 to N arguments.

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Examples:

rangefractile (0.24,1,2,4,6) returns 1

  • rangenumericcount(expr1 [ , expr2, … exprN ])

Returns the number of numeric values found within a range of 1 to N arguments.

Examples:

rangenumericcount (1,2,4) returns 3

  • rangetextcount(expr1 [ , expr2, … exprN ])

Returns the number of text values found within a range of 1 to N arguments.

Examples:

rangetextcount (1,2,4) returns 0

rangetextcount (2,’xyz’) returns 1

  • rangenullcount(expr1 [ , expr2, … exprN ])

Returns the number of NULL values found within a range of 1 to N arguments.

Examples:

rangenullcount (1,2,4) returns 0

  • rangemissingcount(expr1 [ , expr2, … exprN ])

Returns the number of non-numeric values (including NULL values) found among 1 to N arguments.

Examples:

rangemissingcount (1,2,4) returns 0

  • rangeminstring(expr1 [ , expr2, … exprN ])

Returns the first value in text sort order found among 1 to N arguments.

Examples:

rangeminstring (1,2,4) returns 1

rangeminstring (‘xyz’,’abc’) returns ‘abc

  • rangemaxstring(expr1 [ , expr2, … exprN ])

Returns the last value in text sort order found among 1 to N arguments.

Examples:

rangemaxstring (1,2,4) returns 4

  • rangemode(expr1 [ , expr2, … exprN ])

Returns the mode value, i.e. the most commonly occurring value within a range of 1 to N arguments. If more than one value shares the highest frequency, NULL is returned.

Examples:

rangemode (1,2,9,2,4) returns 2

  • rangeonly(expr1 [ , expr2, … exprN ])

If exactly one non-NULL value exists among the range of N expressions, that value will be returned. In all other cases, NULL is returned.

Examples:

rangeonly (1,2,4) returns NULL

  • rangecorrel(x-value , y-value { , x-value , y-value})

Returns the correlation coefficient for a series of coordinates.

X-value and y-value are single values. Each y-value must correspond to an x-value.

Refer this – Which companies are using QlikView.

The function needs at least two pairs of coordinates to be calculated. Text values, null values and missing values are disregarded.

Examples:

rangecorrel (2,3,6,8,9,4) returns 0,269

iii. Exponential and Logarithmic Functions in QlikView

Here, we will discuss 6 sub-types of QlikView Functions:

  • exp(x)

Exponential function, with the base of the natural logarithm e as base. A result is a positive number.

  • log(x)

The natural logarithm of x. The function is only defined if x > 0. A result is a number.

  • log10(x)

The 10-logarithm (base 10) of x. The function is only defined if x > 0. A result is a number.

  • sqrt(x)

Square root of x. The function is only defined if x >= 0. A result is a positive number.

  • sqr (x)

Square of x. A result is a number.

  • pow(x,y)

Returns x to the power of y. A result is a number

iv. Trigonometric and Hyperbolic Functions in QlikView

Here, we will cover total 10 sub-types of QlikView Functions:

  • cos(x)

Cosine of x. A result is a number between -1 and 1.

  • acos(x)

Arcus cosine of x. The function is only defined if -1≤x≤1. A result is a number between 0 and p.

  • sin(x)

Sine of x. A result is a number between -1 and 1.

  • asin(x)

Arcus sine of x. The function is only defined if -1≤x≤1. A result is a number between – p/2 and p/2.

  • tan(x)

Tangent of x. A result is a number.

  • atan(x)

Arcus tangent of x. A result is a number between – p/2 and p/2.

  • atan2(y,x)

Two-dimensional generalization of the arcus tangent function. Returns the angle between the origin and the point represented by the coordinates x and y. A result is a number between – p and + p.

  • cosh(x )

Cosine hyberbolicus of x. A result is a positive number.

  • sinh(x)

Sine hyberbolicus of x. A result is a number.

  • tanh(x)

Tangent hyberbolicus of x. A result is a number.

v. Financial Functions in QlikView

As the name says, these QlikView functions use in financial problems. We are going to explore total 5 sub-types of QlikView Financial Functions with their examples.

  • fv(rate, nper, pmt [ ,pv [ , type ] ])

Returns the future value of an investment based on periodic, constant payments and a constant interest rate.

The result has a default number format of Money.

Example:

You are paying a new VCR by 36 monthly instalments of $20. The interest rate is 6% per annum.The bill comes at the end of every month. What is the total value of the money invested, when the last bill has been paid?

fv(0.005,36,-20) returns $786.72

  • nper(rate, pmt, pv [ ,fv [ , type ] ])

Returns the number of periods for an investment based on periodic, constant payments and a constant interest rate.

Example:

You want to sell a VCR by monthly instalments of $20. The interest rate is 6% per annum. The bill comes at the end of every month. How many periods are required if the value of the money received after the last bill has been paid should equal $786.72?

nper(0.005,-20,0,800) returns 36

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  • pmt(rate, nper, pv [ ,fv [ , type ] ] )

Returns the payment for a loan based on periodic, constant payments and a constant interest rate. The result has a default number format of Money.

To find the total amount paid over the duration of the loan, multiply the returned pmt value by nper.

Example:

The following formula returns the monthly payment on a $20,000 loan at an annual rate of 10 percent, that must be paid off in 8 months:

pmt(0.1/12,8,20000) returns -$2,594.66

For the same loan, if payment is due at the beginning of the period, the payment is:

pmt(0.1/12,8,20000,0,1) returns -$2,573.21

316

  • pv(rate, nper, pmt [ ,fv [ , type ] ])

Returns the present value of an investment. The result has a default number format of Money .

The present value is the total amount that a series of future payments is worth right now. For example, when borrowing money, the loan amount is the present value to the lender.

Example:

What is the present value of $100 paid to you at the end of each month during a 5 year period, given an interest rate of 7%?

pv(0.07/12,12*5,100,0,0) returns -$5,050.20

  • rate(nper, pmt , pv [ ,fv [ , type ] ])

Returns the interest rate per period on annuity. The result has a default number format of Fix two decimals and %.

The rate is calculated by iteration and can have zero or more solutions. If the successive results of rate do not converge, a NULL value will be returned.

Example:

What is the interest rate of a five-year $10,000 annuity loan with monthly payments of $300?

rate(60,-300,10000) returns 2.18%

vi. Mathematical Constants and Parameter-Free Functions in QlikView

These QlikView Functions do not have any parameters. The parentheses are however still required.

  • e( )

Base of the natural logarithms, e. The function returns 2.71828…

  • pi( )

The function returns 3.14159…

  • rand( )

Returns a random number between 0 and 1.

  • true( )

Returns a dual value with text value ‘true’ and numeric value -1, which can be used as logical true in expressions.

  • false( )

Returns a dual value with text value ‘false’ and numeric value 0, which can be used as logically false.

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vii. String Functions in QlikView

The parameters are expressions where s should be interpreted as a string. Here, we will discuss the total 18 subtypes of QlikView Functions:

  • ord(s)

ASCII number of first character of string s. The result is an integer.

Example:

ord(‘A’) returns the number 65

  • chr(n)

The ASCII character corresponding to number n. The result is a string.

Example:

chr(65) returns the string ‘A’.

  • len(s)

Length of string s. The result is an integer.

Example:

len(Name) where Name = ‘Peter’ returns 5.

  • left(s , n)

A substring of the string s. The result is a string consisting of the first n characters of s.

Example:

left(‘abcdef’,3) returns ‘abc’.

  • right(s , n)

Substring of the string s. The result is a string consisting of the last n characters of s.

Example:

right(‘abcdef’,3 ) returns ‘def’.

  • mid(s, n1[, n2 ])

Substring of the string s. The result is the string starting at character n1 with the length of n2 characters. If n2 is omitted, the function returns the rightmost part of the string starting at character n1. The positions in the string are numbered from 1 and up.

Example:

mid(‘abcdef’,3 ) returns ‘cdef’.

mid(‘abcdef’,3, 2 ) returns ‘cd’.

  • index(s1 , s2[ , n])

A position of a substring. This function gives the starting position of the n:th occurrence of substring s2 in string s1. If n is omitted, the first occurrence is assumed. If n is negative, the search is made starting from the end of string s1. The result is an integer. The positions in the string are numbered from 1 and up.

Examples:

index( ‘abcdefg’, ‘cd’ ) returns 3

  • upper(textexpression)

Forces upper case for all data in the expression.

Example:

upper( ‘abcD’ ) returns ‘ABCD’.

  • lower( textexpression )

Forces lower case for all data in the expression.

Example:

lower( ‘abcD’ ) returns ‘abcd’.

  • repeat( s, n)

Forms a string consisting of the string s repeated n times.

Example:

repeat( ‘ * ‘, rating ) when rating = 4 returns ‘****‘.

  • ltrim(s )

Returns the string s trimmed of any leading spaces.

Example:

ltrim ( ‘ abc’ ) returns ‘abc‘.

ltrim ( ‘abc ‘ ) returns ‘abc

  • rtrim(s )

Returns the string s trimmed of any trailing spaces.

Example:

rtrim ( ‘ abc’ ) returns ‘ abc

rtrim ( ‘abc ‘ ) returns ‘abc

  • trim(s )

Returns the string s trimmed of any leading and trailing spaces.

Let’s Explore – QlikView Scripting and Features of Script Editor

Example:

trim ( ‘ abc’ ) returns ‘abc

trim ( ‘abc ‘ ) returns ‘abc

trim ( ‘ abc ‘ ) returns ‘abc

  • KeepChar(s1 , s2)

Returns the string s1 less all characters not contained in string s2.

Example:

keepchar ( ‘a1b2c3′,’123’ ) returns ‘123′

  • PurgeChar(s1, s2)

Returns the string s1 less all characters contained in string s2.

Example:

purgechar ( ‘a1b2c3′,’123’ ) returns ‘abc

  • capitalize(s )

Returns the string s with all words capitalized.

Example:

capitalize (‘my little pony’) returns ‘My Little Pony

  • evaluate(s )

If the text string s can be evaluated as a valid QlikView expression, the evaluated result of the expression will be returned. If s is not a valid expression, NULL is returned

Example:

evaluate ( 5 * 8 ) returns 40

  • TextBetween(s , beforetext , aftertext [, n ])

Returns the text between the n:th occurrence of beforetext and the immediately following occurrence of aftertext within the string s.

Example:

TextBetween(‘<abc>’, ‘<‘, ‘>’) returns ‘abc

viii. Mapping Functions in QlikView

  • applymap(‘mapname’, expr [ , defaultexpr ] )

where:

mapname is the name of a mapping table that has previously been created through the mapping load.

expr is the expression, the result of which should be mapped.

defaultexpr is an optional expression which will be used as a default mapping value if the mapping table

does not contain a matching value for expr.

Example:

// Assume the following mapping table:

map1:

mapping load * inline [

x, y

1, one

2, two

3, three ] ;

ApplyMap (‘map1’, 2 ) returns ‘ two’

  • mapsubstring(‘mapname’, expr)

The MapSubstring function is used to map parts of any expression to a previously loaded mapping table.

The mapping is case sensitive and non-iterative and substrings are mapped from left to right.

Examples:

// Assume the following mapping table:

map1:

mapping load * inline [

x, y

1, <one>

aa, XYZ

x, b ] ;

MapSubstring (‘map1’, ‘A123’) returns ‘A<one>23’

Also, Read – QlikView Set Analysis 

ix. Inter Record Functions in QlikView

These QlikView functions are used when a value from previously loaded records of data is needed for the evaluation of the current record.

  • exists(field [ , expression ])

Determines whether a specific field value exists in a specified field of the data loaded so far.

Example:

exists(Month, ‘Jan’) returns -1 (true) if the field value ‘Jan’ is found in the current content of

the field Month.

  • previous(expression )

Returns the value of expression using data from the previous input record that was not discarded due to a where clause.

Examples:

Load *, Sales / previous(Sales) as Increase from …;

Load A, previous(previous( A )) as B from …;

  • peek(fieldname [ , row [ , tablename ] ] )

Returns the contents of the fieldname in the record specified by row in the internal table tablename. Data are fetched from the associative QlikView database.

Example:

peek( ‘Sales’ )

returns the value of Sales in the previous record read ( equivalent to previous(Sales)

  • FieldValue(fieldname , n )

Returns the field value found in position n of the field fieldname (by load order).

Example:

FieldValue( ‘HelpText’, 5 )

  • FieldIndex(fieldname , value )

Returns the position of the field value value found in the field fieldname (by load order).

Example:

FieldIndex( ‘Name’, ‘John Doe’ )

  • lookup(fieldname, matchfieldname, matchfieldvalue [, tablename])

Returns the value of fieldname corresponding to the first occurrence of the value matchfieldvalue in the field

Example:

lookup(‘Price’, ‘ProductID’, InvoicedProd, ‘pricelist’)

x. Conditional Functions in QlikView

7 sub-types of QlikView Functions are discussed below, let’s study them with their examples:

  • if(condition , then , else)

The three parameters condition, then and else are all expressions. The first one, condition, is interpreted logically. The two other ones, then and else, can be of any type.

Example:

if( Amount>= 0, ‘OK’, ‘Alarm’ )

  • alt(case1[ , case2 , case3 , …] , else)

The alt function returns the first of the parameters that has a valid number representation. If no such match is found, the last parameter will be returned. Any number of parameters can be used.

Example:

alt( date#( dat , ‘YYYY/MM/DD’ )

  • pick(n, expr1[ , expr2,…exprN])

Returns the nth expression in the list. n is an integer between 1 and N.

Example:

pick( N’A”B’4, , , )

returns ‘B’ if N = 2

returns 4 if N = 3

  • match( str, expr1 [ , expr2,…exprN ] )

The match function performs a case sensitive comparison

Example:

match( M, ‘Jan’,’Feb’,’Mar’)

returns 2 if M = Feb

returns 0 if M = Apr or Jan

Let’s Revise QlikView Database Connection & Inline Data

  • mixmatch( str, expr1 [ , expr2,…exprN ] )

The mixmatch function performs a case insensitive comparison.

Example:

mixmatch( M, ‘Jan’,’Feb’,’Mar’)

returns 1 if M = Jan

  • wildmatch( str, expr1 [ , expr2,…exprN ] )

The wildmatch function performs a case insensitive comparison and permits the use of wildcard characters (* and ?) in the comparison strings.

Example:

wildmatch( M, ‘ja*’,’fe?’,’mar’)

returns 1 if M = January

returns 2 if M = fex

  • class(expression, interval [ , label [ , offset ]])

Creates a classification of expressions.

Example:

class( var,10 ) with var = 23 returns ’20<=x<30′

xi. Logical Functions in QlikView

  • IsNum( expr)

Returns -1 (true) if the expression can be interpreted as a number, otherwise 0 (false).

  • IsText(expr)

Returns -1 (true) if the expression has a text representation, otherwise 0 (false).

  • IsPartialReload( )

Returns – 1 (true) if the current reload is partial, otherwise 0 (false).

xii. NULL Functions in QlikView

  • Null( )

Returns a real NULL value.

  • IsNull(expr )

Returns -1 (true) if expr returns NULL, otherwise 0 (false).

xiii. Date and Time Functions in QlikView

Total 17 sub-types of QlikView functions are discussed below:

  • second(expr)

Second. Returns an integer representing the second when the fraction of expr is interpreted as a time according to the standard number interpretation.

Examples:

second( ’09:14:36′ ) returns 36

  • minute(expr)

Minute. Returns an integer representing the minute when the fraction of expr is interpreted as a time according to the standard number interpretation.

Examples:

minute( ’09:14:36′ ) returns 14

  • hour(expr)

Hour. Returns an integer representing the hour when the fraction of expr is interpreted as a time according to the standard number interpretation.

Examples:

hour( ’09:14:36′ ) returns 9

  • day(date)

Day. Returns an integer representing the day when the fraction of expr is interpreted as a date according to the standard number interpretation.

Example:

day( ‘1971-10-30’ ) returns 30.

  • week(date)

Week number. Returns an integer representing the week

Example:

week( ‘1971-10-30’ ) returns 43.

  • month(date)

Example:

month( ‘1971-10-30’ ) returns Oct

  • year(date)

Example:

year( ‘1971-10-30’ ) returns 1971.

  • weekyear(date)

The year to which the week number belongs

Examples:

weekyear( ‘1996-12-30’ ) returns 1997.

Refer this – Properties of QlikView Documents

  • now([ timer_mode])

Returns a timestamp of the current time from the system clock

  • today([timer_mode] )

Returns the current date from the system clock

  • LocalTime([timezone [, ignoreDST ]])

Returns a timestamp of the current time from the system clock for a specified time zone

Examples:

localtime (‘Paris’)

localtime (‘GMT+01:00’)

  • MakeDate(YYYY [ , MM [ , DD ] ] )

Returns a date calculated from the year YYYY, the month MM and the day DD.

Examples:

makeweekdate(1999,6,6) returns 1999-02-14

  • AddMonths(startdate, n , [ , mode] )

Returns the date occurring n months after start date or, if n is negative, the date occurring n months before start date.

Examples:

addmonths (‘2003-01-29’,3) returns ‘2003-04-29’

  • TimeZone( )

Returns the name of the current time zone, as defined in Windows.

Example:

timezone( )

  • GMT( )

Returns the current Greenwich Mean Time, as derived from the system clock and Windows time settings.

Example:

gmt( )

  • UTC( )

Returns the current Coordinated Universal Time.

Example:

utc( )

  • DaylightSaving( )

Returns the current adjustment for daylight saving time, as defined in Windows.

Example:

daylightsaving( )

So, this was all about QlikView Functions Tutorial. Hope you like our explanation.

5. Conclusion

These were near all the QlikView functions names and categories. If you want to know about any other function, leave your comment in the comment section below and we will provide you with more information.

See Also – QlikView Aggregate Functions

Reference

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